Sunday, 21 February 2010

****Growth stocks as a class has a striking tendency toward wide swings in market price (II)

The striking thing about growth stocks as a class is their tendency toward wide swings in market price.

But is it not true, that the really big fortunes from common stocks have been garnered by those 
  • who made a substantial commitment in the early years of a company in whose future they had great confidence and 
  • who held their original shares unwaveringly while they increased 10-fold or 100-fold or more in value?

The answer is "Yes."  

Click to see:
10 Year Price Chart of Top Glove

But the big fortunes from single company investments are almost always realised by persons who have a close relationship with the particular company - through employment, family connection, etc. - which justifies them
  • in placing a large part of their resources in one medium and 
  • holding on to this commitment through all vicissitudes, despite numerous temptations to sell out at apparently high prices along the way.
Click to see:
5 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
2 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
1 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
6 month Price Chart of Top Glove
3 Month Price Chart of Top Glove
1 Month Price Chart of Top Glove


An investor without such close personal contact will constantly be faced with the question of whether too large a portion of his funds are in this one medium. 

Click to see:
5 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
2 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
1 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
6 month Price Chart of Top Glove
3 Month Price Chart of Top Glove
1 Month Price Chart of Top Glove


Each decline - however temporary it proves in the sequel - will accentuate his problem; and internal and external pressures are likely to force him to take what seems to be a good profit, 


Click to see:
5 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
2 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
1 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
6 month Price Chart of Top Glove
3 Month Price Chart of Top Glove 
1 Month Price Chart of Top Glove 

but one far less than the ultimate bonanza.

Click to see:
10 Year Price Chart of Top Glove



Comments:
  1. Be a good stock picker.  
  2. Think as a business owner.
  3. Always look at value rather than the price.  Do the homework.
  4. Buy and hold is alright for selected stocks.
  5. Compounding is your friend, get this to work the magic for you.
  6. Mr. Market is there to be taken advantage of.  Do not be the sucker instead.  BFS;STS.
  7. Always buy a lot when the price is low.  Doing so locks in a higher potential return and minimise the potential loss.  But then, if you have confidence in your stock picking, you would have picked a winner - it is only how much return it will deliver over time.
  8. Never buy when the stock is overpriced.  Not observing this rule will result in loss in your investing.  This strategy is critical as it protects against loss.
  9. It is alright to buy when the selected stock is at a fair price.
  10. Phasing in or dollar cost averaging is safe for such stocks during a downtrend, unless the the price is still obviously too high.
  11. Do not time the market for such or any stocks.   Timing can increase returns and similarly harms the returns from your investment. It is impossible to predict the short term volatility of the stock, therefore, it is better to bet on the long-term business prospect of the company which is more predictable. 
  12. By keeping to the above strategy, the returns will be delivered through the growth of the company's business. 
  13. So, when do you sell the stock?  Almost never, as long as the fundamentals remain sound and the future prospects intact.    
  14. The downside risk is protected through only buying when the price is low or fairly priced.  Therefore, when the price is trending downwards and when it is obviously below intrinsic value, do not harm your portfolio by selling to "protect your gains" or "to minimise your loss."  Instead, you should be brave and courageous (this can be very difficult for those not properly wired)  to add more to your portfolio through dollar cost averaging or phasing in your new purchases.  This strategy is very safe for selected high quality stocks as long as you are confident and know your valuation.  It has the same effect of averaging down the cost of your purchase price.  However, unlike selling your shares to do so, buying more below intrinsic value ensures that your money will always be invested to capture the long term returns offered by the business of the selected stock.
  15. Tactical dynamic asset allocation or rebalancing based on valuation can be employed but this sounds easier than is practical, except in extreme market situations.  Tactical dynamic asset allocation or rebalancing involves selling at the right price and buying at the right price based on valuation.  Assuming you can get your buying and your selling correct 80% of the time;, to get both of them right for a profitable transaction is only slightly better than chance (80% x 80% = 64%).  Except for the extremes of the market, for most (perhaps, almost all of the time), for such stocks, it is better to stay invested (buy, hold, accumulate more) for the long haul.
  16. Sell urgently when the company business fundamental has deteriorated irreversibly. (Reminder:  Transmile)
  17. You may also wish to sell  should the growth of the company has obviously slowed and you can reinvest into another company with greater growth potential of similar quality.  However, unlike point 14, you can do so leisurely.
  18. In conclusion, a critical key to successful investing is in your stock picking ability.  To be able to do so, you will need to acquire the following skills:
  • To formulate an investing philosophy and strategy suitable for your investing time horizon, risk tolerance profile and investment objectives.
  • The knowledge to value the business of the company.  
  • The discipline to always focus on value.
  • The willingness to do your homework diligently.
  • A good grasp of behavioural finance to understand your internal and external responses to the price fluctuations of the stock in the stock market.
  • A good rational thinking regarding the risks (dangers) and rewards (opportunities) generated by the price fluctuations of the stock in the stock market.



Top Glove Insider action:
Tan Sri Dr. Lim Wee Chai
Disposed 26/1/2007 100,000
Acquired 14/2/2007 34,540,661 (Bonus issue)
Disposed 6/4/2007  6,300,000
Acquired 9/5/2007 1,000,000
Acquired 22/6/2007 500,000
Acquired 12/7/2007 438,900
Acquired 18/7/2007 403,900
Acquired 25/7/2007 157,200
Acquired 12/9/2007 200,000
Acquired 18/9/2007 580,000
Acquired 24/3/2008 50,000
Expiration of ESOS-options 29/4/2008

(The only ESOS-option not converted and expired were those noted on 29/4/2008.  After this date, Mr. Lim continued to convert ESOS-options at regular intervals and did not buy or sell other shares of his company.  The large sale of shares in 6/4/2007 followed the large bonus issue Mr. Lim acquired on 14/2/2007.)

Click to see:
5 Year Price Chart of Top Glove
10 Year Price Chart of Top Glove

From the price chart of Top Glove, we can draw the following points:

The price of Top Glove peaked at around $14 at the beginning of January 2007.
It dropped to around  $9 in February 2007.
In April 2007, the price was around $9.20 when Mr. Lim sold 6,300,000 shares; he did not sell at the highest price possible.
In May 2007, the price was around $8.95, Mr. Lim bought back 1,000,000 shares.
The share price continued dropping to $6.00 in September 2007; Mr. Lim bought back 580,000 shares.
Mr. Lim continued to buy from May 2007 to September 2007 a total of 2.9 million shares.
It was obvious that even Mr. Lim phased-in his buying of the shares at various prices, rather than timing the buying of his shares at the lowest price.

1 comment:

1-million-dollar-blog.com said...

Do you think there is still an upside potential for TopGlove at current price?